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This book starts with a group of men heading out on a fishing vessel, wistful of escaping from under the oppressive thumb of the Empire. The decision to board a frigate floating dead in the water, its presence given away by the smoke rising from it,  results in the two friends Nisiris and Vared being taken prisoner and forced to fight each other to the death in a sacrificial duel or both be sold as slaves. One will escape.

The story, however, follows another man, Koth, in a humble village far removed from the influence of the Empire, out hunting with his twin brother.

Koth seems an unlikely and imperfect hero, my favorite kind of hero. Not identical twins, he is the lesser of the two brothers in all ways. He knows nothing of the world beyond his small village realm and doesn’t seem to be a very good hunter. His fellow villagers don’t seem to think he’s good at much of anything.

Koth and his brother, Bizen, do have a special ability. They can communicate telepathically with each other. But of the two, only Koth has the ability to heal others.

Koth’s life was decided for him since before he was born, for his ability to heal wounds by touch is rare even among his people. When an attempted kidnapping turns to sacrificial murder, he embraces vengeance and the sword. As he journeys far from his small, isolated village in the north, he learns the truth as to why his bloodline is targeted by strange magic, in a world still rebuilding from a time when dark sorcerers didn’t bother with secrecy.

Koth thinks his quest is straightforward enough: find the men responsible and kill them—and any who aid them. He will soon learn that those who have both privilege and power, there are few things they lack—and in the pursuit of godhood, their allies can prove even more sinister as mere mortals seek to advent empires and dynasties.

Witchslayer’s Scion by L. T. Getty is a third person narrative of events that befall our imperfect hero, Koth, after the murder of his brother and attempted kidnapping of Bizen’s betrothed.

Travelling with his aunt, Una, in the name of vengeance, he will discover the world is much larger and stranger than he imagined, and that revenge isn’t always what you imagine.

While every chapter does not focus on our hero, as new characters emerge to take the center stage, Getty does a good job of using a variety of characters to drive the story forward and introduce new revelations about this world, leading back to Koth’s story.

 For me, Koth’s imperfections and naive failings make him all the more likable as a character.

 If you are into swords and sorcery that lies heavier on the storyline and less focused on the magic itself, you will enjoy L. T. Getty’s Witchslayer’s Scion. This book does not distract from the characters and events of the story with overemphasis on the magic, keeping your attention and focus where it belongs, within this imaginary world.

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What you learn about this narcissistic vampire … you have to read L. T. Getty’s lovely story.

 

 

Marie is a loner and something of a self described self-exiled outcast who, centuries later, is still mourning the loss of the love of her life. The story doesn’t tell the why and how of this. That is a story set before this one. Was she always like this? Or was she driven to it? Her one friend, Rosa, follows her through the events shaping her, always at her side in her own shallow personality as the, ‘Let’s party and have fun,’ girl.

 

One question in my mind through this book was whether all the vampires are truly as vain, shallow, and self-centered as Marie says they are, or is that a construct of her own depths of those attributes which she must deflect on others in her need to feel she fits in.

 

I had reservations about the cover at first, it gave me a strong ‘romance’ vibe, but found it surprisingly suiting to the main character.

 

 

Dreams of Mariposa by L. T. Getty is a first person account of a vampire telling her story.

Taken unwillingly from her plans to relocate when Raoul shows up to tell her she is summoned by the Council with no option to refuse, Marie is thrust into their scheme without knowing the depth of their intentions.

 

As a vampire who is so ancient and powerful that even the sun cannot touch her, allowing her to walk in daylight, and who easily fits into the social circles of mortals, the Council needs her help in uncovering a mystery hiding powers possibly much older than their own order’s beginnings.

 

The events after that can best be described as leading her down into the madness in the darkness of her vampiric soul and which she chose to be blind to because perfection is to be sane and adored by all. As her world unravels at the end of her narrative, the truth of some of her tale is revealed, and the lies she told herself to keep her shield of perfection in place.

 

I found the main character, Marie, to be entirely unlikable. That doesn’t mean you won’t like her, only that I failed to see any redeeming qualities in her personality. I rather liked L. T. Getty’s portrayal of Marie as being flawed by her own perfection. It gives Marie more personality than if she were simply evilly and immortally perfect. Her view of the world she lives in revolves around her need for everyone including herself to be fully immersed in the glory of her self-perceived flawlessness. As I read, I hoped more than once that she would be staked.

 

As a vampire, this isn’t necessarily a bad thing when it comes to character development. If anything, it made her more real to me. This narcissistic view of herself is entirely fitting, considering she is immortal on an almost godlike level compared even to her nearly immortal brethren. Centuries of seeing yourself as being superior far above all mortal, and even most immortal, creatures would turn more than a few to narcissism, I would think.

 

Marie sees the other senior vampires as being similarly shallow and self-absorbed narcissists incapable of caring for anyone. Is that merely a reflection of herself? You will need to read L. T. Getty’s lovely story and decide for yourself.

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Photo by Raphael Rychetsky on Unsplash

As an author one of your jobs is endless self-promotion.

 

I did my first ever book bog tour. I mean a real tour, not one where your publisher sends your book to all of two fellow authors in their stable to review it and calls it a tour (yeah, this did happen). This, despite having my first short story published in an in-print anthology in 2009. (I’m not counting the multiple E-zine flash fiction and short stories), and my first book published in 2014 by that same Indy publisher, followed by another. (Wow, it feels so much longer ago than that!) And, I’ve been writing for a lot longer than that.

 

It was kind of terrifying. Okay, a lot terrifying. 62 book bloggers over 30 days received complementary copies of my 4-book series to blog and/or review at their discretion.

 

Photo by Belinda Fewings on Unsplash

 

To add to the, ‘will they hate it,’ fear, I’m not entirely a conventional writer. I’m not a follow the traditional rules write to the long established scripted standards kind of author. I don’t conform to the status quo, the norms; the overall expectations of, ‘This is how it has always been done, so this is how you have to do it,’ mindset. I don’t obey the, ‘This is the currently popular style/person so you must do it too.’ Literary art, to me, is not meant to be kept in a tidy box of expectations.  (And, those expectations are expanding with the volume of Indy and self-pubbed books.)

 

 

 

 

 

Book blog tours is only one of the ways to try to get the attention of the readers at large in the hopes they will be interested enough to buy your books.

It is important to note here that people who manage book blog tours do not generally do it purely out of the generosity and kindness of their own hearts. Book blog touring is a paid service. While the bloggers and book reviewers are not paid (their only compensation is the free book), the tour manager will charge you a fee, and the rates will vary.

 

 

Photo by Estée Janssens on Unsplash

My book blog tour was a fail and I’ll tell you why. Predominantly, in going through each blog or Facebook page after their scheduled posting date, almost every one was like skimming through those Facebook groups of endless self-promotion. You know the ones, where countless authors hopeful and desperate seeming plug themselves in a never-ending stream of self-promotion posts that nobody looks at. Few of the authors posting on these groups take the time to scroll through the other advertisements, fewer still with the goal of finding something to buy. I doubt anyone else even looks at them.

 

 

The other problem was the genre. You need to sing to your target audience. Can you imagine Alice Cooper or Ozzie Osborn stepping on to the stage and belting out lyrics to a crowd who bought tickets to Michael Bublé or Beyoncé? As Alice would croon, “Welcome to my nightmare…”

 

Photo by Katie Montgomery on Unsplash

The blogs that signed up for the tour were mostly populated by streams of “book tour” advertisements for romance. Yes, romance. I write dark fiction; thrillers, dark mystery, psychological thrillers, drama with dark twists, not so cozy mystery with an underlay of you guessed it – darkness. I have not to date tried writing a dark romance. Frankly, I don’t think I could write a romance. Romance and dark fiction tend to appeal to very different kinds of readers.

 

I did get some positive comments on my book covers, even a few on the books’ write-ups. And I got one review so far from the 62 blogs. Do I expect to see any sales from it? It’s possible. Just because there was no uptick in sales during the 30-day tour, doesn’t mean no one who saw or participated will buy. Some buy later. I don’t think it’s likely, though; romance and thriller being unlikely crossover genres.

 

The comments were also generally from the bloggers themselves posting on the blog tour operator’s blog. They already got complimentary copies, so they aren’t going to buy the books. If a book farts in the woods and nobody hears it, will they buy it? There seemed to be little, if any, traffic outside those bloggers to any of the blogs.

 

 

Photo by Dorian Hurst on Unsplash

Can a book blog tour be successful?  Yes. The question is, ‘How?’ It’s about following basic rules of marketing.

 

Find your audience. If these were blogs featuring thrillers, horrors, suspense, mystery, and other related genres, odds of sales would have been driven up exponentially, assuming anyone reads the blogs.

 

Traffic is necessary. I suspect blogs that feel like Facebook groups of endless self-promotion ads with nothing else to offer probably get just as much meaningful traffic: little to none. You need blogs that pull traffic in, that have meat and potatoes and lactose free/gluten free/vegan-loving poutine (if such a thing exists). What you need are blogs the people who might read your book are interested in what they have on the blog menu.

 

 

Incentives are helpful. People love to feel like they got a deal. Thus, the giveaway. I gave away a couple of small Amazon gift cards and a few free copies of an eBook I was not trying to drive sales on in the book tour. If it was a short tour, I might have offered a discounted sale on the books.

 

Be inclusive and try to make friends. You want people to want to buy your book, and to make it as easy for them to do it as you can. Remember, everyone who might buy is your friend.

 

Personal touch is important. Self-promotion is not just about immediate book sales. It is also about building your author platform and growing your hoard of followers, some of whom will buy your books – eventually. More followers can be gained by being personable and engaging with them than standing behind a smokescreen plugging ads at them.

 

Be seen.  If nobody knows you exist, you don’t, right? Kind of like that Schrödinger-styled tree that may or may not have made a sound when it fell in the forest. Your marketing needs to hit as many eyes as you can, but not literally. This is not A Christmas Story or the Addams Family.

 

 

Photo by elizabeth lies on Unsplash

How the book blog tour works is that the tour operator puts out a call for bloggers to sign up. Once the signups are complete, the bloggers are scheduled to blog on certain dates. It could be a blog, Facebook blog page, or other online site.  The bloggers get a complimentary copy of your eBook(s).

 

You fill out an author Q&A interview and/or write up some short guest blog posts to be shared with the bloggers.

 

On their designated day, the blogger puts up the blog post. It could be a cut and paste of the book tour info (all but one did this on my tour), they could post the relevant information and pictures with their own personal narrative introducing it, or they can post a book review.

 

Ideally, you want each blog post to be unique. Pre-written author interview Q&As or guest posts from you are key here. So is regular active participation from the bloggers, rather than blogs filled with empty cut and paste advertisements.

 

You visit each blog and make comments thanking the blogger and responding to any comments left by anyone else. Again, be personable and try to make friends.

 

Sit back and hope for sales, and don’t forget to tip your waiter/waitress.

 

 

 

Other ways to self-promote your self and books include, but are not limited to:

– Book and/or author website/blog is discoverable on internet search engines

– Social media. Be social online and blog.

– Newsletter/email subscriptions (ie Mailchimp).

– Category choices and keywords for your book sales listings and Google searches.

– First appearances. Your cover needs to make them want to pick it up.

– Book promotion. Pay for some outside promotion help.

– Give it away FREE! Allow free download of the first 10%-20%, free short/flash fiction.

– Book events. Set up author signing tables and schmooze, sell, and sign.

– Have some swag. Give away business cards and bookmarks.

– Submit to eZines, magazines, and anthologies featuring short stories and flash fiction.

– Get mentioned in local newspapers and newsletters.

 

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I am re-posting this book review on a book that deserved more recognition than it got.

Light Bringer by Pat Bertram, an author who has done so much over the years to help developing authors.

 

When strange things happen people go to Chalcedony.  But what is so special about the little town?

Helen Jenks’ life changed with a drive home on a snowy night.  That change came in the form of an infant girl, who she calls Rena, which she finds abandoned on her doorstep.

It becomes immediately apparent that Rena is not your usual kind of abandoned-on-the-doorstep baby.  There is something special about the child.  Helen soon finds herself living on the run with the child, but on the run from who or what?

And that is where her story ends and the real story begins.

Philip Hansen opens his door to unexpected guests, Agent’s Derrick and Hugh from the National Security Agency.  Philip immediately suspects they are there to discuss the books he’s been checking out at the library.  He sounds borderline crazy-guy conspiracy theorist, but Philip quickly shows himself to be no crazier than anyone else who thinks aliens are visiting Earth.

With a little help from an unlikely source, Philip escapes the two agents, who aren’t who they claim to be, and finds himself drawn involuntarily on a path not of his choosing.

Becka Johnson, baby Rena grown up and with a new name, returns to Chalcedony thirty-seven years after her adoptive mother found her.

Becka has decided it’s time to find the answers to her lifelong questions that center around “who am I?” And she believes those answers can be found in Chalcedony, Colorado where her life started on a snowy night on a stranger’s doorstep.

In a financial bind, Jane Keeler finds herself in Chalcedony searching for her sister George Keeler.  Instead of finding her sister, she discovers an empty house, ransacked office, and abandoned car.

Georgy’s apparent wild ways make things difficult for Jane as she finds herself drawn by the need to investigate this mystery and learn her sister’s whereabouts.  Only no one seems to believe her or to even care.

When the trio converges on Chalcedony with no knowledge of each other, things immediately take a turn for the strange.

Philip Hansen arrives to find himself thrust into the arms of Becka Johnson, literally, when he’s dropped off at her doorstep.

Things soon heat up for Philip and Becka when the strange things happening to each of them grow in intensity with their proximity, leading them forward on an adventure of discovery.

Jane is pulled into the strange events surrounding Philip and Becka, finding herself drawn into the midst of a bigger mystery than she’d anticipated.

In Light Bringer, Pat Bertram weaves a fascinating tale of a group of people connected by events in the past, beginning before they were even born, who are inexorably drawn together for the culmination of what was started so many decades before.

In drawing out the strange events linking these three, I also had the impression that the small town of Chalcedony, Colorado hides other secrets that could very well find themselves revealed in another tale entirely unrelated to this story.

Light Bringer is published by Second Wind Publishing, LLC.

Something apart from the story that you might find interesting is this excerpt from Light Bringer (Page 217).

There are three details in particular that will have a sense of familiarity if you have read Pat Bertram’s More Deaths than One.

Hugh & Keith in are in a conference room in the underground bunker going through files taken from George Keeler’s house

Excerpt:

Hugh lifted one transcript out of the file.  “Here’s an interview she did with Bob Noone.”

                “Who’s he?”

                “You know.  The weird guy.”

                Keith laughed.  “That narrows it down.”

                “He’s the artist, the one you thought seemed like a chameleon.”

                “Oh, him.  His work sure mesmerized you.  I could hardly drag you away.”

                Hugh shuddered, remembering that a monstrous thing had seemed to lurk in the depths of the painting, pulling him in, captivating him in the archaic sense of the word: taking captive.  He realized he’d been captivated in the same way by this place, the source of that dreadful hum.  All at once he felt glad not to have found the source.  Perhaps some secrets should remain unknown.

                “What did he have to say?”

                Hugh started at the sound of Keith’s voice.  “He spouts the same rubbish as everyone else in that ridiculous town.  Listen to this.  ‘I didn’t move to Chalcedony until the late eighties, so I don’t know anything about the UFO flap, but if you want my opinion, it would have been a mind control experiment.  Government is a beast without conscience, and when it teams with conglomerates, it can and will do anything.  Even control us as if we were robots.’”

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THE WIND GUARDIAN CoverI received a free copy of this book in exchange for reviewing it.  It took a bit of time to get through this book with trying to read it over the busy and highly distracting Christmas season.  The terrorist action plot is not my favorite genre, but I have no regrets in taking the time to read The Wind Guardian.  This is an honest and unbiased review.

The Wind Guardian is the first Frank Scozzari book I have read.  If you are looking for a terrorist threat action story that is driven by the characters and does not get lost in the details then you will enjoy this book.

This story is set in the comfort of a United States nuclear power facility where years of living comfortably safe leaves bored security officers with a lackadaisical attitude towards their jobs and the painstaking planning and work that goes into the security of the plant.  Despite the best efforts of their supervisor, John Harkin, to keep his security officers alert and performing diligently to their by-the-book routine, some of his staff continually take a careless approach to their jobs, sneaking off for illicit rendezvous and naps.  The reason for their jobs, threat of terrorist attack, is a world away for our characters.

In The Wind Guardian, Frank Scozzari brings the self-absorbed lives of two characters, newly enamored lovers and co-workers, Cameron and Grace crashing down in a seeming unstoppable catastrophe.  Other developments are in play while Cameron communes with nature in the “bone yard”, a protected archeological and burial site of the native Chumash, who he came to feel an affinity with, and Grace and he focus on trying to find ways to communicate on the shared open radio channel and meet up on the job.  The pair makes the most unlikely of heroes, and are thrust in the center of events by their own selfish choices to put their mindless lust and an obsession with each other worthy of teenagers over their duties.

While Frank Scozzari pauses in the action to fill the reader in on the workings of the nuclear facility and the bureaucracy, planning, routine, and weapons behind keeping it safe, he does it expertly without bogging down the story in the details.  If anything, the tedium of guarding the plant and all the details that ago into it is a good set up for what is coming.  The obvious tedium of the characters jobs and their lack of interest in performing them makes the events that unfold, and how easily, more believable.

Frank Scozzari brings home in a realistic way just how easily the safety we take for granted can be taken away.

The Wind Guardian by Frank Scozzari is available through various online retailers.

 

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Paladin Book 1 The Evil Within the Woods.jpgBefore I get into the review, I received a free copy of this book from the author to review.  That said, this is an unbiased review.  I only review books I have actually read, and only give an honest review.

 

If you read Fitzgerald’s other book UnAlive and are expecting a similar read, you will be disappointed.  Kevin Fitzgerald’s UnAlive is a zombie apocalypse adult genre.  Paladin is a middle year’s animal tale gentle thriller.

 

Similar to stories like Watership Down and the Secret of NIHM, Paladin is written from the point of view of the animal characters, specifically the rabbit whose story is central to the plot.  Unlike the other stories, however, the human characters of Paladin are active characters in the story, rather than being some vague aspect of the animals’ world.  This adds a depth to the story in that you are bound not just by the fate of the rabbit, but also the fates of the people who saved him.

 

Paladin starts with the rabbits of the “warenne” sensing a coming change and danger.  I won’t give away what happens, but a catastrophe does happen, bringing the story from the introduction of the wild rabbits to the meat of the story.  This, the first book of the Paladin series, is Paladin’s story, a young rabbit of the “warenne”.

 

Paladin finds himself a home with a boy, Joshua, and his father, Theo.  Their pleasant life does not stay that way for long.  Theo’s onetime employee, Lou Lyons, has other plans for Theo’s business, and a self-invented grudge to avenge, putting Paladin in the center of his revenge.

 

Paladin is a children’s story.  I would place it around middle year’s grades.  The drama surrounding Paladin will appeal to kids who still like stories about animals, but this story is more than about an animal with a human-like sentience.  You are also drawn into the lives of the human characters, whose own drama Paladin is the center of.  In the end, you are left waiting for book two to find out what comes next as Paladin is thrown into the next chapter of his adventure.

 

Paladin Book 1: The Evil Within the Woods by Kevin J. Fitzgerald is self-published and is available on Amazon.

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temptaion.

Tempting, isn’t it?

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You think, if only I can get enough reviews of my book to push the rating up, then my sales will go up.

And you are right.  But the problem can be in getting those reviews.  The stats on how many people who read your book will leave a review are abysmally small, less than five percent.

And, the reviews you do get can work against you.  Too many five star reviews will leave potential readers suspicious.  If you only have five star reviews that will definitely make them wonder.  Your best chance of making more sales from your reviews is to have a mixed bag of reviews.  Some fives, fours, and even the odd three star review.  After all, who is going to believe that every single person who read your book absolutely loved it?  Even the biggest name authors have their detractors who trash their books in reviews.

But, getting those reviews can be so hard that you can find yourself stuck with a scathingly bad review and very few positive ones to counter it.

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cryOr, like millions of writers languishing in Amazon obscurity, you could be sitting there with none or so few reviews that even you have trouble finding your own book on this and other sites.

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This is how there came to be a market for paid reviews.  As tempting as it may be to go down that road, there may never be any turning back.

Paid for reviews will always be suspect.  After all, you did buy the review.  Who buys a bad or mediocre review?  No, you want good reviews for your money.

No one will believe a paid for review is a true and honest review.  They certainly won’t believe it is unbiased.  Anyone with the money can buy positive advertising, which is all a paid for review is.  It’s also a poor choice in advertising spending.

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Once you gain a reputation for using paid for reviews that reputation will stick to you like “the cheese touch” in Diary of a Wimpy Kid.  All reviews on your books will be suspect.

And now, you have another reason to avoid paid for reviews.

Amazon has begun taking legal action against the use of paid for reviews.

Amazon does make it very clear in their guidelines that paid for reviews are not allowed.

They also do not allow overfriendly reviews.

We have all heard stories about Amazon having a dislike for people reviewing books of authors they know and are connected with in any way.  So, authors doing review swaps tend to get their reviews of each other’s books removed by Amazon.  Review swaps may be a popular way to get reviews in exchange for giving reviews, but are limited in where they can be used.

Amazon does also say on their review guidelines that family members and close friends are not allowed to leave product reviews.  Perhaps this is rightly so, since their reviews would obviously be biased.

But who is to say that a simple review swap, or someone connected on social media, even has a close enough relationship for it to bias their review?  The majority of the people I am connected with through social media are near strangers, connected through shared interests and author groups and little more.

Read Amazon’s guidelines for reviews.

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ostracisedGiving paid for reviews also will damage your reputation as an unbiased reviewer.

You should also take note that some countries do have laws regarding paid for reviews, including the United States.  A paid for review is required to state that it is a paid for advertisement, even when it is on a blog or a review on a sales site like Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and Smashwords.

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No matter how tempted you may be, if someone offers to give you a paid review of your book, you should politely decline.

The same if someone offers to pay you to give them a review.

It just isn’t worth it in the long run to ruin your reputation both as a writer and a reviewer.

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There is one distinction to note.  While money, gifts, and other financial incentives definitely do count and must be disclosed, giving reviews in exchange for free books can be a grey area.

Typically, receiving a free book in exchange for reviewing it is not considered a paid for review.  However, it is recommended to note whether or not you paid for that book or received it free in exchange for a review.

This is where you should tread carefully.  If all of your reviews are for books you received free in exchange for a review, this gives the assumption that you expect benefits (i.e. free books) in exchange for giving reviews.

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David Pereda Twin Powers book coverTwin Powers starts with the kidnapping of ten year old Stephanie while on vacation in Cuba with her mother and twin sister by a mysterious stranger who appears to be an Arab tourist.  Her mother, Sonia, is given a message from a street vendor who happened to be there.

 

  “He said to tell you that this is payback,” the old man said, his voice cracking.  “That you would never see your daughter again.”

This leaves Sonia and the authorities wondering who could possibly have a grudge against her that they would kidnap her daughter to punish her for.

From there the reader is pulled along as Stephanie’s estranged parents, along with a professional assassin called in by the Cuban government, try to learn the identity of the kidnappers and track Stephanie down.

As the drama unfolds, suspicions shift, and they discover that a human trafficking ring has kidnapped the girl.  The deeper they go into the world of Middle East human traffickers, the more it begins to look like there is something more than sex slavery behind the kidnapping.

In Twin Powers, David Pereda has created a world of international intrigue that runs deeper than the story initially suggests, centering on the kidnapping of a child.

Twin Powers by David Pereda is published by Second Wind Publishing, LLC, and is available on their web site, Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and Smashwords.

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Kevin J Fitzgerald UnAlive coverUnAlive is hailed as “Night of the Living Dead meets The Book of Eli.”  I had to watch Book of Eli after reading UnAlive to see if the comparison fits.  I would have to say that UnAlive is better than the comparison to Night of the Living Dead suggests, but The Book of Eli is not a bad comparison.

UnAlive starts with a decent hook; the mysterious character, Cian of the Nomos, the half-lives.  It sets the tone that something unusual is going to happen in a way that leaves you curious to learn more.

Something is happening in the world and, at first glance, it seems to be some kind of an attack.  General Pitman Grady leads the military investigation.  Dr. Kwom Thomas joined them as an unwilling guest brought in at the suggestion of Susan Grey.

Meanwhile Adam Gardner’s world is turned upside down and destroyed during what would have been a peaceful afternoon in the country with his wife and two sons, if not for the sudden withering death of the vegetation around him, followed by the movement of frightening shapes coming from the woods accompanied by terrible noises.  But this seems to be a dream and Adam awakes in prison.  We soon learn that it is memories, not a dream.

UnAlive jumps between the military’s attempts to find out what is going on in a world that seems to be dying en mass, Dr. Kwon Thomas’ The Two Natures study from his attempts to research the strange mass deaths of flora and fauna and worldwide collapse of life, an old priest, and Adam Gardner’s life in jail and flashbacks to his life before.

When the zombies, dubbed the UnAlive, take over the world, it becomes a race for survival and against extinction of the human species.  Meanwhile the Nomos, or half-lives, have their own agenda.  I would describe the Nomos as vampires before I would call them zombies.

I was wary when I was asked to review a zombie apocalypse book.  I couldn’t help the inward groan.  I hoped for the best and was ready for the worst.  The obsession with zombies since Walking Dead made its debut has resulted in a saturation of bad zombie everything, and there have been too many bad zombie movies and books before that.  For the record, I do not dislike zombies themselves.  It’s just that the majority of zombie movies  and my few attempts at reading a zombie book have been B movie grade at best – B for B.A.D.  I do, however love The Walking Dead.  So you have some idea where my standards lie in the zombie world.  This book was worth the read.

In UnAlive Kevin J. Fitzgerald gives us a zombie vampire apocalypse with some good descriptions of faces eating themselves from the inside and some scenes that would be Walking Dead worthy if they were adapted to film by a good director and film team.  The book has enough suspense to draw you deeper into the story.

UnAlive is self-published by Kevin J. Fitgerald and is available on Amazon and Goodreads.

You can follow Kevin J. Fitzgerald on Goodreads and Facebook.

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Your Life With Rhuematoid Arthritis by Lene Andersen

Your Life with Rheumatoid Arthritis by Lene Andersen is raved as an insightful resource for people living with rheumatoid arthritis.

Check out this review  of Your Life with Rheumatoid Arthritis written by Wren on RheumaBLog

Your Life with Rheumatoid Arthritis is available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Kobo books, iBooks, Smashwords, CreateSpace

L Andersen author photo

Lene Andersen blogs at

The Seated View
Lene and her book can also be found at:

Lene’s Amazon Author Page

And

The Your Life with Rheumatoid Arthritis website

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