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When most people think of publishing in the UK, their minds will probably wander directly to London. Seeing as London is home to publishing powerhouses such as Bloomsbury and HarperCollins, that’s a fair direction to go in. However, it’s this process of thinking that often steers people away from maneuvering away the London box. Step outside of that box and there are a plethora of equally admirable independent publishers to be found, especially in Scotland. While small, these publishers not only offer quality literature, but provide a more personal touch in the way they interact with their readership. Four particularly admirable publishers in this group include Saraband, Freight Books, Canongate, and Vagabond Voices.

1) Saraband

This Glasgow based company is known for its carefully crafted non-fiction titles (specifically nature, history, and memoir) and growing literary and crime fiction lists. The company was named the Saltire Society’s Publisher of the Year…

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A Writer's Path

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by Lindsey Richardson

Whether you’re working full time at an office or a full time parent, it gets even more complicated when you add writing into the mix. And whether this is your first novel or fourth novel, it’s likely to still be a daily struggle. But that doesn’t mean that it’s at all impossible or a dreadful task.

Let’s face the reality of it: it takes a lot to write full time. And some of us just aren’t there yet, but that doesn’t take anything away from the work we do. As many of you know, I work full time and write as well. It’s been that way every day since I graduated high school.

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Book Contracts

PAUL MANNERING - SPECULATIVE FICTION AUTHOR

Conventional wisdom says that writing a book is easy, editing is hard. Getting published by anyone other than Createspace is like flying –  it requires a great deal of perseverance, determination, a can-do attitude, and a shit-load of luck. A lack of sensitivity to pain, and a profound deafness to nay-sayers helps as well.

contract

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The Nerdy Book blog

Have you ever heard of WattPad or even experienced it? Well if you havent, you must!

WattPad  is a writing community in which users are able to post articles, stories, fan fiction, and poems, either online or through the mobile app. This gives people the chance to have their creative works available to a wider audience. (info from Wikipedia)

Wattpad

I have the app on my iPhone and iPad. There are popular authors on there who write short stories or write add ons to books that have been published. For intense an author I love, Jamie McGuire, has added onto the book Beautiful Disaster. I love the Maddox brothers and was so excited to be able to find out what happened after reading about Travis and Abby. It’s an extremely addicting story and who wouldn’t want to be all up in Travis Maddox’s business! Another author is Jennifer Armentrout, who happens…

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BusinessWorld

How Data Is Fueling the Future of the Publishing Industry

PopSugar is using visual and interactive analytics to create viral and engaging content.

PopSugar and its digital shopping platform ShopStyle combines a unique blend of content and commerce. Together these brands are attracting over 100 million monthly visitors worldwide.

Channeling the phenomenal success of Snapchat has also proven to be an incredibly shrewd move. PopSugars made-for-Snapchat videos have generated 19.5 million views in April, 26 million in May, 35 million in June and July looks to continue this trend. These figures are further evidence that Snapchat is no longer just another app for faddy teenagers.

Millennial women-focused, the core audience has an insatiable desire to learn more about what’s going on in the world. But, it’s technology and innovation that is proving essential to growing their audience. Could this data-driven business help anticipate the stories that readers will click on?

A…

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WritingMad

It doesn’t matter what you’re writing, a short or a full-length novel, voice is the lifeblood of your work. You might have all the elements of a great story – a dazzling twist, an arc to rival a rainbow – but if you haven’t got a voice that mesmerises, your story will be drowned out by dull.

I’m reading  Glorious Heresies at the moment – and the riotous voice is fair shaking me up and demanding I listen. It’s pushed me right into the mess that’s Maureen clobbering some bloke over the head with a holy stone and killing him.

A week ago, I polished off Elizabeth Strout’s Olive Kitteridge. The voice of the flawed yet deeply loveable Olive is so believable, so sturdy that my race to read was slowed only by me underlining far too many sentences.

Mind you, just thinking about books like these can be really…

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Jeff Russell The Girl Who Watched Over DreamsLife for Kat (Doctor Katrina Hammond) is not turning out the way she envisioned.  Despite her misgivings, she agrees that her mother going into E.D.E.N.’s perpetual sleep program is the best choice for her mother, who is suffering from chronic rheumatoid arthritis.

Engulfed with sorrow over her loss of her mother, plagued by doubts about the program, and uncertain about the science and the quality of life her mother will have in a forever dream state, Kat agrees to take a job at E.D.E.N. This, at least, allows her to be near her mother and watch over her.

Soon after taking the job at EDEN, Kat is approached by a reporter, Morgan Brewer, who is investigating EDEN.  Distrusting his role as a reporter and suspicious his interest is only a pretense to get information from her to use against her employer; she unwillingly turns to him when she has no other options.

It doesn’t take Kat long to become suspicious that EDEN is not the idyllic sanctuary promised for the faceless residents of their perpetual sleep program.  There is something darker happening behind the scenes of EDEN, and Kat’s inability to let it go pulls her deeper into that secret.

Jeff Russell creates a believable character in Kat, a recent graduate doctor of Neuroscience.  She is grounded by her newness to the field, filled with enough self-doubt to add to the challenges she faces, and likeable.  As she presses on with her clandestine investigations over her suspicions, she is pulled in opposing directions.  She doubts her own suspicions, becomes newly suspicious of her employer, convinces herself EDEN really is helping, and becomes disturbed again by her discoveries at EDEN.

Jeff Russell does not overburden his medical thriller with technical descriptions, keeping the story flowing and compelling.  I read this story in less time than I usually do, laying back and putting off the things I really should be doing so I could keep reading.

I received a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

 

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